Machines “think” differently but it’s not a problem (maybe)

Yet another article about the interpretability problem of many AI algorithms, this time on the MIT Technology Review, May/June 2017 issue.

The issue is clear; many of the most successful recent AI technologies revolve around deep learning: complex artificial neural networks – with so many layers of so many neurons transforming so many variables – that behave like “black boxes” for us.
We cannot comprehend anymore the model, we don’t know how or why the outcome to a specific input is obtained.
Is it scary?

In the film Dekalog 1 by Krzysztof Kieślowski – the first of ten short films inspired to the ten Christian imperatives, the first one being “I am the Lord your God; you shall have no other gods before me”  – Krzysztof lives alone with Paweł, his 12-years-old and highly intelligent son, and introduces him to the world of personal computers. Continue reading “Machines “think” differently but it’s not a problem (maybe)”

Agile for managing a research data team

 

An interesting read: Lessons learned managing a research data science team on the ACMqueue magazine by Kate Matsudaira.

The author described how she managed a data science team in her role as VP engineering at a data mining startup.

When you have a team of people working on hard data science problems, the things that work in traditional software don’t always apply. When you are doing research and experiments, the work can be ambiguous, unpredictable, and the results can be hard to measure.

These are the changes that the team implemented in the process: Continue reading “Agile for managing a research data team”

Premium prices and data

Putting a premium price on certain products which cost almost the same to produce is a common marketing trick which can be brought back to the price sensibility of the different consumer and is having now a boom thanks to the extremely exact consumer profiling.
Think about the cappuccino made with fair trade coffee or with vanilla flavour. By buying one of them you send the message that you don’t mind paying a bit extra.
The strategy is to charge the highest price that the consumer will pay for that product.
A pricing strategy called First Price discrimination:

Exercising First degree (or Perfect/Primary) price discrimination requires the seller of a good or service to know the absolute maximum price (or reservation price) that every consumer is willing to pay.

More generally there are 3 common techniques for finding customers who are the first degree price discrimination: Continue reading “Premium prices and data”