Egocentric leaders

Enterprise employees work better and are more efficient if their leader is introvert.
Charismatic and egocentric leaders are better only with “passive” collaborators.
This is the result of a study done by researchers  from Harvard and Wharton business schools and published in the Academy of Management Journal, in a trend opened one year ago by a study from Judge, Piccolo and Kosalka, published on The Leadership Quarterly.

When among the team members there are people with goodwill and resourcefulness, then leaders who are introverts and thoughtful are more suitable.
Exactly the ones who were considered inadequate because unable to motivate, give impetus and optimism. Nothing far away from truth. It’s the leaders who tend to attract others’ attention who are – at the end – not able to coordinate and get the best from the collaborators.

Effective leaders are quiet and reserved. This is what allows them to convince people and attain important results.

Specifically, the researchers meant to split the halo effect (what others perceive or believe to perceive) of a charismatic boss from the concrete impact on the people’s operation, measuring the teams performances.

The result: egocentric leaders reached the best profits when the employees were significantly more passive and submissive. On the other side, when the employees were proactive and enterprising they reached the worst results exactly when driven by egocentric leaders.

If you are extrovert, it’s very likely that you will become a leader. But this doesn’t mean that you will be able to positively contribute to your group performance. Those managers, according to the researchers, are missing the ability to absorb the useful suggestions from the subordinates, legitimate and implement the changes and take care of the improvements and / or the collaborators have the feeling that their hints are not listened to.
Moreover, they tend to look for domain conquering more than ideas harvesting.

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